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Tag: books

Confessions of a public speaker by Scott Berkun

In the past 5 years, I have given four public speeches and although they went well a strange thing happened. Every time I stepped onto the stage the master orator i had imagined myself to be panicked, packed his bags and ran for the exit. Leaving a slightly awkward fella behind to deliver the talk. Although the content and laughs were the same, they didn’t seem as interesting or funny.

So, this year I have made it a goal to: a) learn how to become a better public speaker and, b) to find someone brave enough to let me have another go. With that in mind I trudged off to Waterstones, book voucher in hand, to pick up a copy of Scott Berkun’s Confessions of a public speaker and boy, I’m really glad I did!

As with his other books: Making things Happen and Myths of innovation. He combines expert storytelling and command of his subject to create an entertaining and practical book on the dos and don’ts of public speaking.

Chapter 5, Do not eat your microphone, alone is worth the cover price. As the simple process, he applies to crafting a presentation can be used equally as effectively when creating essays and blog posts.

The book boils down to three main themes:

  • Know your material
  • Know your audience
  • Practice, practice, practice

Of these, he shares honest, hard-won advice which is guaranteed to make your next presentation a much more rewarding experience for you and your audience.

This book is for anyone who has to give a presentation to their boss, clients or has the ambition to become a conference speaker. It’s a highly enjoyable, quick read (once you start you won’t want to put it down – I read it in a day). Well worth the £18.

Design of everyday things, Second Edition

Design of Everyday Things, Second Edition. Once Sociable Design is in its final form, I intend to update DOET (as DOET-2). The principles have not changed, but the examples in DOET-1 are stale.The world of everyday things changed and so too have I. I have learned much since DOET-1 that will inform, modify, and broaden the discussions. I’m looking for good examples.They have to be timeless. I want DOET-2 to last 20 – 30 years, so any examples have to be things that will be relevant decades from now. For example, suppose I would have had photographs of teletype machines in DOET-1: who today knows what they are? Doors never get obsolete.)

How very cool 🙂

Not only will there be a second edition but we can suggest example for Don to include.

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